About Skypp

Indianapolis rapper Skypp has built a reputation as the voice of reason in the streets with his brand of Sophisticated Street Music. Shining a light unto the underground with witty bars of wisdom and cautionary narratives, Skypp's music is a blend of cerebral boom-bap, trap prophecies and braggadocious flows over modern productions. Following a Top 15 charting release on iTunes in 2020 for his project, The Ghetto Mr. Rogerz, Skypp's latest album drop, King of Indiana, is an empowering collection of storytelling, metaphors and melody. The song Fix Yo’ Crown' features longtime Kanye West collaborator Rhymefest; whom reached out about doing the track after hearing Skypp's album, U4U.

 Finding major notoriety in 2011 with his Skypp Saturday's series on Soundcloud, accumulating more than half a million plays, the King of Indiana would soon find himself rubbing elbows with the industry's elite. In 2012, the song "Do" would garner the attention of female fans and a local promotional company presenting the opportunity to perform the song in concert, opening for Yo Gotti. Soon later, Circle City's prodigal emcee was approached about a record deal by fellow Naptown native and entertainment legend, Mike Epps. Flown out to Atlanta for Tupac's Anniversary Celebration, Skypp met hip-hop icons Rick Ross, Meek Mill and Tupac's mom, Athena Shakur

 Though, as the label dissolved, it led Skypp to seek new management. Not to be left empty-handed from the experience, he was quickly introduced to Billboard-topping songwriter and manager, Sid "Uncle Jamz" Johnson (Manchild, Babyface, Field Mob, Mariah Carey), to be his next manager.

 Skypp's myth has continued to grow amidst America's Crossroads and the surrounding region, performing on stage with the likes of DMX, Too $hort, Anthony Hamilton, Floetry, and DJ Quik to name a few. In 2017, Skypp joined Babyface on tour for stops in Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, Nashville and his hometown of Indianapolis, fulfilling a childhood dream performing at Banker's Life Field House.

 Recognized for his contributions in the Indianapolis community, Skypp's face was featured on the side of an IndyGo metro bus in 2019 as part of their redline transportation promotion.

 A career that has embodies growth, and maturation through the years, Skypp's message of introspection, self-awareness and empowerment is a far cry from his idea of rap dreams when he first started writing rhymes in 6th grade. Once enamored by the facade and lifestyles of industry rap, the humble King of Indiana is looking to make a difference, more than a dollar these days, working in schools and around the community as a living example of his words on wax.